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Poetry Friday: Nature's Lava Lamp

Another summer poem this week. 

Last week while I was waiting for a train, I watched wisps of clouds slowly stretching, twisting and folding back in on themselves. It was mesmerizing - like watching nature's version of a lava lamp. 

That experience inspired today's poem. 

Photo of thin white clouds against a bright blue sky. Poem: cool breezes nudging folding twisting  gossamer clouds white on summer blue  © 2021, Elisabeth Norton


Mary Lee Hahn is our gracious host for Poetry Friday this week. I hope you'll stop by her blog where many other wonderful poems await you.

Comments

  1. Oh, wow! Just this morning I was also mesmerized by wispy clouds! I took some reference photos but haven't written them into a poem yet. I love "gossamer clouds." Perfect.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by Mary Lee. Mesmerized is the perfect word to describe what it feels like to watch clouds!

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  2. Elisabeth, I love that image of nature's lava lamp. That puts an immediate picture into my mind of what the sky must have looked like that day. "White on summer blue" sounds like a painting, a moving painting here. The magic of nature.

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  3. We've had stunning clouds in upstate NY and I love to watch them "nudging, folding, twisting." They are lava lamp reminders. It's important that all that doesn't go unnoticed.

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    1. I agree, Janice! I'm trying to find moments of mindfulness in nature, wherever I am.

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  4. What a lovely gift in waiting. (A gift that is so often lost these days, with the ever-present screen.) So glad you captured the moment.

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    1. "Gift in waiting" is a lovely way to describe the natural beauty around us! Thanks for stopping by Kat.

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  5. I've been swimming on my back more JUST so I can watch the clouds. Your lava lamp metaphor is wonderful--I wonder why you didn't put it in the poem? Wishing you more summer blue!

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    1. What a wonderful way to enjoy nature's display! I played with putting that phrase in the poem but found I liked the flow better without it, so decided to keep it as the title. Glad you like it!

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  6. Our clouds, sadly, have appeared less because of wildfire smoke, but I have a photo fire just labeled 'clouds'! I love that final line, "white on summer blue", am waiting for the return!

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    1. Wishing you clear, blue skies soon, Linda! Thanks for stopping by.

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  7. Beautiful clouds in words and picture!

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  8. I love the reference to clouds as gossamer. Beautiful.

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  9. Gossamer is perfect for clouds, and I can feel the "folding" and "twisting" movement in your poem, thanks, Elisabeth!

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  10. Isn't it delightful that clouds can still mesmerize and inspire us? I love the lava lamp-like result here! :)

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    1. I find nature is the best way for me to slow down and reset. Thanks for stopping by Karen :-).

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  11. Hi Elisabeth,
    I am glad we kind of met today on Janet and Sylvia's great workshop. I decided to try to find you here and I did!! Yes to loving gossamer clouds. When I can I will look back at your blog and try to get to know you better. I suspect another wonderful kindred soul and maybe you can answer a question or two about Twitter for me. I get it, I can do it, but I get confused. (I am in the "mature" senior category but don't think I should lump people as tech neanderthals, but I have never really figured Twitter out. FB is more my speed. If you are there, I am Janet Clare.

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    1. Hi Janet Clare! Wasn't that a great workshop? I learned so much. Thanks for finding me in my little corner of the internet. I am probably going to rejoin Twitter (at least give it a go for a while). I'm glad to stay in touch here and on Twitter. (I'm not on Facebook).

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