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Poetry Friday: Oasis

Summer seems eager to usher spring out the door: the daylight is lasting longer, the temperatures are getting warmer, and everywhere we look, flowers are blooming. On every walk I'm delighted by wisteria, foxglove, candytuft, snowball viburnum and more. (Aren't flower names wonderfully poetic?)

This week they mowed the grass at the park where we take our lunchtime walks. These patches of wildflowers that were left for the insects to enjoy inspired my poem this week.


Trees with a green lawn in front of it, with a patch of daisies in the middle. Poem: Oasis, by Elisabeth Norton copyright 2021 all rights reserved. Instead of green in a dry, brown landscape, white and yellow in a lush green lawn.  Instead of palms and pools of water for weary travellers, blooms with pollen and nectar for butterflies and bees.

Our host today is Margaret at Reflections on the Teche. Click over to see what other poetic delights await you on this Poetry Friday.


Comments

  1. Elisabeth, what a lovely image of an oasis of white and yellow blooms for the insects. I love your observant poem, the analogy of the oasis, and the closeup of the wildflowers left un-mowed. I picture the butterflies and bees as weary travelers too; and your poem makes me happy that they don't have to keep looking.

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    1. "I picture the butterflies and bees as weary travelers too;"

      My thoughts exactly Denise! Thanks for stopping by my little oasis today :-).

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  2. I love when the landscapers leave these patches of flowers on the lawns! The perfect oasis for our flying insect friends. :)

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    1. They make me so happy. I saw another one in the city yesterday. I've started noticing oases everywhere ... I might feel another poem coming on. :-)

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  3. Can I come visit you at your oasis? It's lovely and very inviting!

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    1. Thanks for your virtual visit to my poetic oasis!

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  4. That field of flowers must bring you so much happiness. I love the sounds in your poems -- "palms and pools" "butterflies and bees."

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    1. Thank you! I love to play with alliteration in poetry.

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  5. Our gardeners do that, too, in a nearby park. And keep only 'some' lawn. Like others, I love the idea of those 'weary travelers'.

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    1. I had never seen that until I moved to Switzerland. I'm glad to know other gardeners in other parks around the world are leaving oases for "weary travellers."

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  6. A lovely image matched with an equally lovely poem. An oasis indeed!

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    1. Thank you Sally. These lunchtime walks are my own "oasis" in the middle of the busy days. I always come back feeling refreshed.

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  7. What a beautiful landscape and your poem is a great companion piece.

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  8. What a wonderful new take on oasis -- the flip from green in a world of brown, to white in a world of green! We need more patches like this that provide solace for our pollinators!

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    1. Thank you Mary Lee. When I sat down to write this, I knew right away that I wanted to flip the typical association a reader would have between green and oasis. It was fun to play with!

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