Skip to main content

Poetry Friday: A Mindful Poem



Thanks to everyone for the lovely comments on my Poetry Friday post last week! I’m glad you enjoyed hearing about springtime at the pond. The tadpoles are visibly bigger than last week, and this week we learned that they’re not the only younglings in the pond.

One day as we approached, we heard more croaking than we've ever heard before. As we neared the pond, we found out why. Two young salamanders and an adult were actively swimming in the deep center of the pond. One of the adult frogs was sitting in the reeds near the center of the pond croaking frequently, and more tadpoles than we had ever seen together were clustered in the shallow water near the edge of the pond. 


It's fascinating getting these glimpses into the world of this pond. I'll continue to share updates from time to time, especially when we see our first pollywogs.


Even though yesterday was a holiday here, it’s been a busy week for me. When I get busy, meditation and poetry help me feel anchored in the present moment, so today for Poetry Friday I’m sharing an excerpt from one of my favorite mindful poems, from the anthology Poetry of Presence: An Anthology of Mindfulness Poems, edited by Phyllis Cole-Dai and Ruby R. Wilson.


The poem is “Instructions for the Journey,” by Pat Schneider. I love everything about this poem, but these lines feel particularly applicable as I look back over the past few years:


“The world, too, sheds its skin:
politicians, cataclysms, ordinary days.
It’s easy to lose this tenderly 

unfolding moment…”


I love the end of this poem but I won't spoil it here. You can read the full poem and hear a recording of the author reading it over on her website


This week’s host for Poetry Friday is Irene Latham over at Live Your Poem


I wish you all mindful moments in the coming week!

Comments

  1. Elisabeth, what a sweet mindful celebration of the pond. My students and I used to raise water dogs into adult tiger salamanders. It was fascinating. We'd buy them in the bait store, and release them in the lake when they became adults. Thank you for the invitation to read and the link to the poem on the journey by Jan Schneider. Beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Denise! I can imagine how amazing it would be to be able to follow the development of the salamanders more closely than we're able to by visiting the pond.

      Delete
  2. Really lovely & uplifting. I like every part, the feeling of "as if it were the first clear tone/in a place where dawn is heralded by bells." And I like hearing about your frogs, a likely spring chorus. I often think of them as rehearsing for some grand play. Have a great weekend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Linda! I'm so glad you enjoyed the poem, and hearing about the frogs. I'm looking forward to the coming weeks as we watch them grow and develop.

      Delete
  3. How beautiful...I have done that...stand at the sink. Thank you for sharing this poem.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm so glad to that something that I've found meaningful is resonating with others. Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  4. Thanks for another peek in your pond, Elisabeth. I'm worried about those tadpole.
    And thanks for sharing Schneider's words: "Feel it." - yes!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too, Bridget! There are hundreds of them, and I know that we'd be overrun if every one of them grew up into a frog that left the pond but ... I don't like to think of them as little links in the food chain either!

      Delete
  5. Thank you for keeping us up to date with the pond goings-on, and the reminder to remain mindful.

    ReplyDelete
  6. It's lovely how "the one you are becoming" applies to everyone, all the time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't it? I think that's one of my favorite phrases in that poem.

      Thanks for stopping by, Tabatha!

      Delete
  7. Thank you for posting Pat Schneider's poem. It's wonderful. I enjoyed listening to it. I also love frogs and tadpoles and ponds.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm so glad you enjoyed the poem Janice. I love learning about poets from other posts on Poetry Friday, so when I was feeling pressed for time because of my busy scheduled, that poem seemed the perfect one to share.

      Delete
  8. I love Pat Schneider's work. Thanks so much for sharing this one. And I'll be on the lookout for the next tadpole update. :)

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Frost

I first encountered the poetry of Robert Frost in high school, and I was captivated enough to buy my own unabridged collection of his poems, which took up residence on my nightstand along with the collected works of Charles Dickens and Arthur Conan Doyle. Frost's Stopping By The Woods on a Snowy Evening is one of the first poems I can remember learning by heart. It is the poem that taught me that poetry holds, at its essence, potential energy. For the first time I connected with a poem so deeply that it took up residence and became a part of me, where it remains at rest, until suddenly it isn't. I'll be walking a dog when the night is dark and snowy, and the trees stand silent vigil between the brook and the pasture, and the poem is drawn spontaneously, instantly, into motion, its lines moving easily, rhythmically through my mind, perfectly capturing my experience in that moment and I think "This! This is what Frost was distilling onto the page." I love the m

Poetry Friday: A Tricube for Spring

Last month, in honor of National Poetry Month, my friend Bridget Magee over at Wee Words for Wee Ones wrote a poem a day using photos as her inspiration. Now Bridget has inspired me to use a photo as the inspiration for my poem today.  (that's a lot of inspiration :-) We've been waiting all spring for the frogs to emerge from hibernation at the pond, and a little over a week ago, I heard this fellow. It took me a while to find him though. Can you find him too? I believe this is a pond frog, a species that is common here in Switzerland. Inspired by the frog and a new poetic form I discovered in last week's poetry Friday, my poem this week is a  tricube , a mathematical poetic form introduced by Phillip Larrea. The rules are simple: Each line contains three syllables.   Each stanza contains three lines. Each poem contains three stanzas. The frogs haven't wasted any time since emerging from hibernation. Those tiny black dots with tails in the next photo are tadpoles! I h